Une économie créative et compétitive

Réseuatage d’internet national

Pour ceux d’entre nous qui sont nés dans l’ère de l’information, il est évident que l’amélioration de l’efficacité de notre gouvernement dépendra de l’utilisation de l’internet. Le potentiel des technologies à large bande de révolutionner les moyens par lesquels le gouvernement canadien soutient son économie et son bien-être social promet un futur excitant pour tous les Canadiens. Les idées sont illimitées : en commençant par plus de transparence gouvernementale, par des consultations télédiffusées sur le web, en explorant la capacité de voter à distance, à plus de responsabilités non seulement des gouvernements, mais aussi des citoyens.

S’il n’y a jamais eu un meilleur moment où notre démocratie pourrait être améliorée de façon radicale, c’est maintenant au 21e siècle. Comme la construction du chemin de fer au 19e siècle, donner accès à l’internet à tous les Canadiens pourrait unir le pays à travers une démocratie plus forte.

Par contre, ce futur est seulement possible si le pays en entier peut y avoir accès. Dû à la grandeur de notre nation, dans chaque province et territoire il existe plusieurs communautés éloignées qui n’ont toujours pas accès à une connexion internet haute vitesse. Tout au plus, ces communautés ont accès à une connexion bas débit et cela n’est certainement pas raisonnable.

La réalité est que les forces du marché libre n’ont aucun intérêt financier à donner les ressources nécessaires à ces communautés afin d’avoir un accès à l’internet, les laissant derrière dans une société et une économie qui dépendent d’un accès à l’internet.

Afin d’assurer l’intégrité de nos gouvernements dans leurs migrations en ligne, comment le gouvernement canadien devrait-il procéder afin d’assurer que chaque citoyen ait accès à Internet haute vitesse/large bande avant 2017 ?

The Creative and Competitive Economy

The Information Superhighway

To those of us born in the information age, it is obvious that improving our government’s efficiency will rely upon, and greatly benefit from, the use of the Internet and web applications. The potential of broadband technologies to revolutionize how the Canadian government bolsters its economy and social well-being is an exciting future that awaits all of us. Ideas are limitless: from greater government transparency through online consultations and town halls, to mobile voting, to greater accountability not only from governments, but also from its citizens.

If there ever was a time where the integrity of democracy could be radically improved, it is now in the 21st century. As the construction of cross Canada railways uplifted the country through igniting industry, bringing all of Canada online can unite the country through a strengthened democracy and self-reflective community.

Yet, this future is only possible if the entire country has access. Due to the sheer size of this nation there are many remote communities in every province and territory still without Internet connections, or at best they have dial-up, and at the web’s current rate of advancement dial-up internet is assuredly not enough.

In short, free market forces have no financial interest in equipping these communities with high speed access, leaving them behind in a society where access to web resources is an assumed given.

To ensure the integrity of our government’s migration online, how should the Canadian government proceed to ensure that every citizen has access to broadband Internet by 2017?

“Canada at 150”: The Chorus Effect

As Justin once told me in private, “if we get it right for Papineau, we get it right for many parts of Canada” and I think that all of us that volunteer for him, truly believe it too. The members of Papineau have big hearts and big ideas but we also have big challenges. Papineau, the riding I was born and raised in, has the lowest average family income in Canada where:

– renters outnumber owners 74% to 26%;
– 22% of residents over age 25 have a university certificate or degree;
– 45% of residents have French as a mother tongue;
– 47% list neither English nor French, with large groups speaking Spanish, Italian, Greek and Arabic as a first language;
– total immigrant population is 40%.

It is for these reasons that my passion and zeal towards the organization of the “Canada at 150” conference in Papineau, as well as, the participation of the members of the riding stemmed from.

What is “The Chorus Effect”
Wikipedia states that, ‘The Chorus Effect’ occurs when “individual sounds with roughly the same timbre and nearly (but never exactly) the same pitch converge and are perceived as one. While similar sounds coming from multiple sources can occur naturally (as in the case of a choir or string orchestra), it can also be simulated using an electronic effects unit or signal processing device.”

I believe that this is what we have been able to achieve in Papineau! It began with a simple email that I received from the party about a conference to discuss the possibility of a better Canada by 2017 then an encounter with the spiritual animators at the Remembrance Day parade in downtown Montreal where the idea of having Justin and I speak to the high school students was born:

February 26th, 2010 – Vincent Massey Collegiate
March 12th, 2010 – Rosemount High School
March 19th, 2010 – Perpsectives I High School
March 19th, 2010 – John F. Kennedy High School
March 22nd, 2010 – John Paul I Junior High School
March 26th, 2010 – Lester B. Pearson High School

Over the past few months, the voices of individuals from origins across the country and all parts of the globe converged on a natural pitch while being simulated through an electronic webcast we have grown to embrace and make our own: Canada at 150. Although this was a journey in itself, it is just the beginning. Our voices have now been unified under “The Chorus Effect” and we will be looking forward to hear what our echo in Papineau, and across the country, will sound like.

Ode to the volunteers
“Canada at 150” could not have been possible without the help of our devoted volunteers, Executive Committee members of the Liberal Association of Papineau and the staff at the Constituency Office and the Ottawa office. A warm thank you goes out to, in alphabetical order according to last name; Rym Achour, Imad Barake, Cassandra Bauco, Roberto Caluori, Luc Cousineau, Stavroula Daklaras, Marie-Claire Di Carlo, Alessandra Di Viccaro, Demetra Droutsas, Behrooz Farivar, James Fequet, Sabrina Gagliardi, David Halk, Salma Hussain, Vince Lacroce, Louis-Alexandre Lanthier, Sacha Lechene, Youcef Londubat, Mehdi Londubat, Marie-Claire Lynn, Melissa Maluorni, Dino Marzinotto, Lisa Montgomery, John Panetta, Nancy Pasquini, André Pelletier, Elizabeth Pellicone, Pierre Riley, Vince Rodi, Anthony Scozzari, Rocco Speranza, Ece Tepedelenli, Connor Timmons, Father Westphal, Carlos Zuleta.

And a special thank you to Ingrid Ravary-Konopka for if it wasn’t for you and your pillar of support, this event would have remained just another email that I would have not addressed.

Papineau satellite “Canada at 150” conference on Saturday, March 27th 2010

The discussions on Saturday began at 1:15pm and lasted until 2:15pm. For this discussion, we had students from John Paul I Junior High School (accompanied by their teachers Alessandra Di Viccaro and André Pelletier) lead the Papineau riding’s conversation (see links to videos below) on the environment and the preamble that “The Chorus Effect” proposed:

Preamble:

Puneet Birji from CPAC’s “On the Bright Side” was present at the conference and interviewed members of the volunteer team, as well as, the students from John Paul I Junior High School. Take a look at what was reported about our conference on the April 4th, 2010 episode of “On the Bright Side”.

Around 2:15pm, we tuned into the webcast:

Day 2: Geopolitics and Canadian Interests in the North American Energy Market with Dan Gagnier and Michael Phelps

Jour 2 : Géopolitique et intérêts canadiens sur le marché nord-américain de l’énergie avec Dan Gagnier et Michael Phelps

Justin’s day did not finish there. Later that evening, Justin was on “One-on-One” with Peter Mansbridge where he answered questions that I have heard being asked over the past 2 years I have been volunteering with him. But no matter how much one may know Justin or how many times one has heard him speak, one can never be 100% certain of what he will say (like Justin’s great response to Peter Mansbridge’s “Prime Minister” question or his controversial behaviour on CTV’s “Question Period” the following morning).

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 1)

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 2)

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 3)

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 4)

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 5)

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 6)

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 7)

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 8 )

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 9)

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 10)

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 11)

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 12)

Theme II: Energy, Environment, and Economy: Growth and Responsibility in 2017 / Theme II: Energie, Environnement, et Economie: Développement et Responsibilité en 2017

Preamble
In Canada, climate change, substantial energy and water consumption, intensive agriculture, and resource depletion are all playing an enormous role in changing the future for how Canadians live their day-to-day lives. We live in the most beautiful country in the world; from coast to coast we have a wealth of different natural resources, whether it is our forestry, agriculture, some of the largest oil reserves in the world, extensive coal and natural gas reserves, an assorted and broad array of minerals, or the third most renewable water resources on earth. The environment is not just an individual subject any longer as it has rapidly become an all-encompassing priority, touching on the political, economic, and social fabric of Canadian lives. Canadian provinces must come together and find common ground, Papineau looks towards our friends in Western Canada for leadership and dialogue to help find a solution that will benefit the entire country. With our abundance of natural resources, inventive corporations, and our prominent place on the world stage it is our responsibility to future generations of Canada and the international community to be a leader on environmental change.

Canadians understand that our country is heavily reliant on the current continental market, specifically the United States but following them on environmental policies is not the path Canadians want to be on. Canada must take the lead in the continental market and push the United States and Mexico to take a larger step in creating environmentally-friendly policies. By becoming the international leader in innovative environmental technologies, policy initiatives, and research, our economy will see immeasurable long-term benefits from exporting commodities and job creation, our country will regain the respect and admiration we have lost in the international community, and most importantly our future generations will live in a healthy, creative, and dynamic country. Our youth are not only the leaders of tomorrow but have become the leaders of today in regards to the environment. We must listen to them in order to comprehend the importance of Canada becoming committed to understanding the impact we are having on the environment and working to continually improve our environmental performance, while encouraging and supporting other countries to do the same.

Préambule
Au Canada, le changement climatique, l’importante consommation d’énergie et d’eau, l’agriculture intensive et la diminution des ressources joueront un grand rôle dans le changement du mode de vie des Canadiens au quotidien. Nous vivons dans le plus beau pays du monde, de la côte Est à la côte Ouest. Nous avons une diversité de ressources naturelles abondantes, que ce soit sur le plan forestier, de l’agriculture, la possession d’une des plus grandes réserves de pétrole au monde, l’importante réserve de gaz naturel et de charbon, le large éventail de minéraux et la troisième plus grande ressource d’eau renouvelable au monde. L’environnement n’est plus un sujet à part mais s’est rapidement propulsé au rang de priorité incontestable qui touche à la vie politique, économique et social des Canadiens. Les provinces canadiennes doivent se réunir autour d’un projet commun, Papineau porte son attention sur ses amis de l’Ouest Canadien pour un leadership et l’ouverture d’un dialogue pour trouver une solution qui bénéficierait au pays tout entier. Avec l’abondance de nos ressources naturelles, nos entreprises innovatrices, notre rôle de premier plan sur la scène international, il est de notre devoir envers les générations futures du Canada et de la communauté internationale d’être un leader dans le domaine des changements environnementaux.

Les Canadiens comprennent que notre pays est dépendant du marché continental actuel, spécifiquement des États-Unis mais suivre leur modèle de législation environnemental n’est pas le chemin que les Canadiens veulent prendre. Le Canada doit aller de l’avant et pousser les États-Unis et le Mexique à prendre de plus grande mesure législative pour l’environnement. En devenant le leader international en innovation technologique environnementale, en recherche et législations innovatrices, notre économie bénéficierait à long terme de l’exportation de denrées et de créations d’emplois, notre pays regagnerait le respect et l’admiration qu’il a perdu sur la scène internationale, et plus important encore, nos futurs générations vivraient dans un pays riche, créatif et dynamique. Nos jeunes ne seront pas seulement les leaders de demain mais par rapport à l’environement, ils sont dorénavant les leaders d’aujourd’hui. Nous devons les écouter si nous voulons comprendre l’importance pour le Canada de s’engager à la compréhension de l’impacte que nous avons sur l’environement et travailler à l’amélioration constante de nos performances environnementales tout en encourageant et aidant les autres pays à en faire de même.

“>Justin Trudeau on “One-on-One” with Peter Mansbridge on Saturday, March 27 2010

On October 2008, the people decided it was time for another Trudeau to head to the House of Commons.

So how’s he doing? What’s he doing? And what could his future hold?

Only one person can answer all that, and he’s here this week to do just that.

Papineau satellite “Canada at 150” conference on Friday, March 26th 2010

It was an exciting day for me. It was the day that would commence the conference that I had been working on for so many hours, so many months. It began with Justin and I’s last visit in our “Canada at 150” high school series at Lester B. Pearson High School scheduled from 8:30 – 10:00am.

We then ran back to Papineau in order to begin our riding discussions from 10:30 – 11:30am (ok, so we were a little late) where we presented the Papineau policy proposals (see below for video proposals and text) and got the members present to give their opinion. Around 11:45am, we tuned into the webcast:

“>Day 1: Rick Miner : The Workers of Today and Tomorrow: Meeting the Challenges of Diversity, Demographics and Community

“>Jour 1: Rick Miner : L’emploi aujourd’hui et demain : la société productive de 2017

A great participation from the members that came out and an encouraging introduction to the days up ahead.

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 1)

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 2)

Theme 1 : Jobs Today and Tomorrow: The Productive Society of 2017 / Thème 1 – Emploi d’aujourd’hui et de demain : Une société productive en 2017

Immigration – Accreditation
Canada was a country founded by immigrants, and due to its small population and large geography, to compete in the global economy it is a country dependent on immigrants. By 2017, the baby boomer population will have been retiring for years, and Canada will have an even stronger dependence on attracting educated and skilled workers from other countries to build upon its prosperity. However, across many of the provinces in this country educated English and French speaking immigrants are still finding that their overseas diplomas invalid or unacknowledged. Not only do these new citizens lose the opportunity to use their skills and fulfill themselves, but the country as whole loses the opportunity to benefit from their talents. In short, there is far too much bureaucracy preventing desperately needed specialists from contributing to our society. Universities have the means necessary to evaluate foreign diplomas; the problem is solely based at a governmental level. If this is truly to be a globalized nation, what can be done to expedite the process of recognizing international education?

Immigration – Accréditations
Le Canada est un pays qui a été fondé par les immigrants. En raison de sa petite population et de son imposante géographie et afin d’être concurrentiel dans une économie globale nous dépendons des nouveaux arrivants. En 2017, les « baby-boomers » auront été à la retraite depuis plusieurs années et le Canada aura un plus grand besoin d’attirer les travailleurs instruits et compétents venant de l’extérieur afin d’assurer sa prospérité. Cependant, dans plusieurs provinces de ce pays, les immigrants ont été instruits en anglais et en français et maîtrisent ces langues, mais on constate que leurs diplômes internationaux sont encore inadmissibles ou non reconnus. Non seulement ces nouveaux citoyens perdent-ils l’occasion d’utiliser leurs compétences et de s’accomplir dans la société, mais le pays entier perd l’occasion de tirer profit de leurs qualifications. En bref, il y a trop de bureaucratie empêchant désespérément les spécialistes nécessaires afin contribuer à notre société. Les universités ont les moyens nécessaires pour évaluer les diplômes étrangers; le problème se situe à un niveau gouvernemental. Si cette nation s’est vraiment intégrée dans le cadre de la mondialisation, qu’est-ce qui pourrait être fait pour accélérer le processus de reconnaissance de l’éducation internationale?

Theme 1 : Jobs Today and Tomorrow: The Productive Society of 2017 / Thème 1 – Emploi d’aujourd’hui et de demain : Une société productive en 2017

Immigration – Language & Culture Training
Seven years from now, in 2017, online mediums for education will be drastically more efficient than they are today. Failure to anticipate the importance and power of online technology could translate into a failure of the government to adapt to the changing state of communication.

Web technology can be utilized by governments to hasten a new Canadian immigrant’s integration into our society through low-cost multimedia and a peer-to-peer support. These programs could help immigrants learn our official languages, while simultaneously helping to expedite a new immigrant’s need to inform themselves on the history, geography, art, aboriginal culture, law and governance of their new country and province. Not only would this type of system help immigrants, but it could also help interested French Canadians learn English, and English Canadians learn French. The second last line should read: ‘It would also provide learners with greater options to choose where and when is most convenient and efficient to engage in learning, providing a range of possibilities for busy families or single parents who do not have the time or resources to travel to classrooms.

How do you see the internet helping immigrants integrate into this country, and help the future of advancing Canadian bilingualism?

Immigration – Langue & Développement culturel
Dans sept ans, en 2017, l’éducation en ligne sera bien plus efficace qu’elle ne l’est aujourd’hui. Un manque d’anticipation sur l’importance et la puissance de l’outil technologique en ligne pourrait se traduire par un échec du gouvernement à s’adapter au changement des moyens de communication.

La technologie internet peut être utilisée par le gouvernement pour accélérer l’intégration des nouveaux immigrants par des échanges interactifs et peu coûteux. Ces programmes pourraient aider les nouveaux immigrants à apprendre nos langues officielles tout en répondant à leurs besoins de connaitre l’histoire, la géographie, l’art, la culture aborigène, la loi et la gouvernance de leur nouveaux pays et de leur province. Ce type de système n’aiderait pas seulement les nouveaux immigrants, mais aussi les Canadiens francophones à apprendre l’anglais et les Canadiens anglophones à apprendre le français. Cela aiderait les personnes qui veulent apprendre à avoir l’option de choisir le moment et le lieu d’entreprendre leur apprentissage. Cela serait une option avantageuse pour les familles qui n’ont pas le temps ni les ressources pour se rendre en classe.

Comment voyez-vous l’internet en tant qu’outil d’intégration des nouveaux immigrants dans ce pays et d’aide au développement du bilinguisme canadien?

Theme 4: The Creative and Competitive Economy / Thème 4 : Une économie créative et compétitive

Community-based Financing
As a liberal and democratic society, we have a responsibility to promote and strengthen organizations and institutions that encourage the economic, cultural, and intellectual development of our citizens. Here in Montreal, we have such organizations that are helping break social exclusion and fortifying our community bonds. We think specifically of the CDEC (Corporation de developpement économique communautaire). Since 1989, the CDEC has as a mission the development and consolidation of community-based economic activities.

We urge the federal government to:
• increase financial and logistical support for social development projects and/or organizations and;
• work with provincial and municipal governments as well as members of the business community to devise new ways to support entrepreneurial initiatives and basic financial education including but not limited to the an endowment-based funding framework at the community level;

La finance communautaire : une infrastructure de développement économique et d’inclusion sociale à promouvoir
Nous avons la responsabilité, en tant que société libérale et démocratique, de promouvoir et fortifier les organismes et institutions qui permettent à nos citoyens de se nourrir économiquement, culturellement et intellectuellement. Ici même à Montréal, nous avons des organismes qui fonctionnent depuis des années avec comme objectifs le développement économique, l’inclusion sociale et la fortification du tissu communautaire. Nous pensons ici particulièrement à la CDÉC (corporation de développement économique communautaire) qui depuis 1989 a pour mission de développer et consolider l’activité économique des populations locales de Montréal, ainsi que lutter contre l’exclusion sociale.

C’est avec cette conviction que nous encourageons vivement le gouvernement fédéral à :
– Augmenter le soutien financier et logistique pour le développement de projets sociaux et/ou soutenir les organismes qui travaillent à cette fin.
– Travailler avec les gouvernements provinciaux et municipaux, ainsi que la communauté des affaires, afin de mieux appuyer les initiatives entrepreneuriales et l’éducation financière de base, ainsi que la création d’un cadre de dotation financière au niveau communautaire.

Theme 4: The Creative and Competitive Economy / Thème 4 : Une économie créative et compétitive

The Information Superhighway
To those of us born in the information age, it is obvious that improving our government’s efficiency will rely upon, and greatly benefit from, the use of the Internet and web applications. The potential of broadband technologies to revolutionize how the Canadian government bolsters its economy and social well-being is an exciting future that awaits all of us. Ideas are limitless: from greater government transparency through online consultations and town halls, to mobile voting, to greater accountability not only from governments, but also from its citizens.

If there ever was a time where the integrity of democracy could be radically improved, it is now in the 21st century. As the construction of cross Canada railways uplifted the country through igniting industry, bringing all of Canada online can unite the country through a strengthened democracy and self-reflective community.

Yet, this future is only possible if the entire country has access. Due to the sheer size of this nation there are many remote communities in every province and territory still without Internet connections, or at best they have dial-up, and at the web’s current rate of advancement dial-up internet is assuredly not enough.

In short, free market forces have no financial interest in equipping these communities with high speed access, leaving them behind in a society where access to web resources is an assumed given.

To ensure the integrity of our government’s migration online, how should the Canadian government proceed to ensure that every citizen has access to broadband Internet by 2017?

Réseuatage d’internet national
Pour ceux d’entre nous qui sont nés dans l’ère de l’information, il est évident que l’amélioration de l’efficacité de notre gouvernement dépendra de l’utilisation de l’internet. Le potentiel des technologies à large bande de révolutionner les moyens par lesquels le gouvernement canadien soutient son économie et son bien-être social promet un futur excitant pour tous les Canadiens. Les idées sont illimitées : en commençant par plus de transparence gouvernementale, par des consultations télédiffusées sur le web, en explorant la capacité de voter à distance, à plus de responsabilités non seulement des gouvernements, mais aussi des citoyens.

S’il n’y a jamais eu un meilleur moment où notre démocratie pourrait être améliorée de façon radicale, c’est maintenant au 21e siècle. Comme la construction du chemin de fer au 19e siècle, donner accès à l’internet à tous les Canadiens pourrait unir le pays à travers une démocratie plus forte.

Par contre, ce futur est seulement possible si le pays en entier peut y avoir accès. Dû à la grandeur de notre nation, dans chaque province et territoire il existe plusieurs communautés éloignées qui n’ont toujours pas accès à une connexion internet haute vitesse. Tout au plus, ces communautés ont accès à une connexion bas débit et cela n’est certainement pas raisonnable.

La réalité est que les forces du marché libre n’ont aucun intérêt financier à donner les ressources nécessaires à ces communautés afin d’avoir un accès à l’internet, les laissant derrière dans une société et une économie qui dépendent d’un accès à l’internet.

Afin d’assurer l’intégrité de nos gouvernements dans leurs migrations en ligne, comment le gouvernement canadien devrait-il procéder afin d’assurer que chaque citoyen ait accès à Internet haute vitesse/large bande avant 2017 ?

Déterminer la nouvelle direction libérale

Le vendredi 26 mars 2010

Le Parti libéral du Canada tient samedi et dimanche une grande conférence qui réunit à Montréal quelques grands penseurs dans des domaines aussi divers que l’économie, la santé et l’environnement.

Ce colloque, auquel sont conviées quelque 300 personnes triées sur le volet, devrait, en principe, contribuer au renouvellement des idées au PLC.

Ce renouvellement se planifie dans un contexte où le parti, sous la chefferie de Michael Ignatieff, vit des moments assez difficiles et ne semble pas toujours avoir de direction politique très claire.

Pour comprendre leur état d’esprit, Frank Desoer est allé sonder le coeur et l’âme de certains militants libéraux.

 

Papineau satellite “Canada at 150” conference on Friday, March 26th 2010

It was an exciting day for me. It was the day that would commence the conference that I had been working on for so many hours, so many months. It began with Justin and I’s last visit in our “Canada at 150” high school series at Lester B. Pearson High School scheduled from 8:30 – 10:00am.

We then ran back to Papineau in order to begin our riding discussions from 10:30 – 11:30am (ok, so we were a little late) where we presented the Papineau policy proposals (see below for video proposals and text) and got the members present to give their opinion. Around 11:45am, we tuned into the webcast:

“>Day 1: Rick Miner : The Workers of Today and Tomorrow: Meeting the Challenges of Diversity, Demographics and Community

“>Jour 1: Rick Miner : L’emploi aujourd’hui et demain : la société productive de 2017

A great participation from the members that came out and an encouraging introduction to the days up ahead.

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 1)

Discussions with members of the Papineau riding before the “Canada at 150” webcast (Part 2)

Theme 1 : Jobs Today and Tomorrow: The Productive Society of 2017 / Thème 1 – Emploi d’aujourd’hui et de demain : Une société productive en 2017

Immigration – Accreditation
Canada was a country founded by immigrants, and due to its small population and large geography, to compete in the global economy it is a country dependent on immigrants. By 2017, the baby boomer population will have been retiring for years, and Canada will have an even stronger dependence on attracting educated and skilled workers from other countries to build upon its prosperity. However, across many of the provinces in this country educated English and French speaking immigrants are still finding that their overseas diplomas invalid or unacknowledged. Not only do these new citizens lose the opportunity to use their skills and fulfill themselves, but the country as whole loses the opportunity to benefit from their talents. In short, there is far too much bureaucracy preventing desperately needed specialists from contributing to our society. Universities have the means necessary to evaluate foreign diplomas; the problem is solely based at a governmental level. If this is truly to be a globalized nation, what can be done to expedite the process of recognizing international education?

Immigration – Accréditations
Le Canada est un pays qui a été fondé par les immigrants. En raison de sa petite population et de son imposante géographie et afin d’être concurrentiel dans une économie globale nous dépendons des nouveaux arrivants. En 2017, les « baby-boomers » auront été à la retraite depuis plusieurs années et le Canada aura un plus grand besoin d’attirer les travailleurs instruits et compétents venant de l’extérieur afin d’assurer sa prospérité. Cependant, dans plusieurs provinces de ce pays, les immigrants ont été instruits en anglais et en français et maîtrisent ces langues, mais on constate que leurs diplômes internationaux sont encore inadmissibles ou non reconnus. Non seulement ces nouveaux citoyens perdent-ils l’occasion d’utiliser leurs compétences et de s’accomplir dans la société, mais le pays entier perd l’occasion de tirer profit de leurs qualifications. En bref, il y a trop de bureaucratie empêchant désespérément les spécialistes nécessaires afin contribuer à notre société. Les universités ont les moyens nécessaires pour évaluer les diplômes étrangers; le problème se situe à un niveau gouvernemental. Si cette nation s’est vraiment intégrée dans le cadre de la mondialisation, qu’est-ce qui pourrait être fait pour accélérer le processus de reconnaissance de l’éducation internationale?

Theme 1 : Jobs Today and Tomorrow: The Productive Society of 2017 / Thème 1 – Emploi d’aujourd’hui et de demain : Une société productive en 2017

Immigration – Language & Culture Training
Seven years from now, in 2017, online mediums for education will be drastically more efficient than they are today. Failure to anticipate the importance and power of online technology could translate into a failure of the government to adapt to the changing state of communication.

Web technology can be utilized by governments to hasten a new Canadian immigrant’s integration into our society through low-cost multimedia and a peer-to-peer support. These programs could help immigrants learn our official languages, while simultaneously helping to expedite a new immigrant’s need to inform themselves on the history, geography, art, aboriginal culture, law and governance of their new country and province. Not only would this type of system help immigrants, but it could also help interested French Canadians learn English, and English Canadians learn French. The second last line should read: ‘It would also provide learners with greater options to choose where and when is most convenient and efficient to engage in learning, providing a range of possibilities for busy families or single parents who do not have the time or resources to travel to classrooms.

How do you see the internet helping immigrants integrate into this country, and help the future of advancing Canadian bilingualism?

Immigration – Langue & Développement culturel
Dans sept ans, en 2017, l’éducation en ligne sera bien plus efficace qu’elle ne l’est aujourd’hui. Un manque d’anticipation sur l’importance et la puissance de l’outil technologique en ligne pourrait se traduire par un échec du gouvernement à s’adapter au changement des moyens de communication.

La technologie internet peut être utilisée par le gouvernement pour accélérer l’intégration des nouveaux immigrants par des échanges interactifs et peu coûteux. Ces programmes pourraient aider les nouveaux immigrants à apprendre nos langues officielles tout en répondant à leurs besoins de connaitre l’histoire, la géographie, l’art, la culture aborigène, la loi et la gouvernance de leur nouveaux pays et de leur province. Ce type de système n’aiderait pas seulement les nouveaux immigrants, mais aussi les Canadiens francophones à apprendre l’anglais et les Canadiens anglophones à apprendre le français. Cela aiderait les personnes qui veulent apprendre à avoir l’option de choisir le moment et le lieu d’entreprendre leur apprentissage. Cela serait une option avantageuse pour les familles qui n’ont pas le temps ni les ressources pour se rendre en classe.

Comment voyez-vous l’internet en tant qu’outil d’intégration des nouveaux immigrants dans ce pays et d’aide au développement du bilinguisme canadien?

Theme 4: The Creative and Competitive Economy / Thème 4 : Une économie créative et compétitive

Community-based Financing
As a liberal and democratic society, we have a responsibility to promote and strengthen organizations and institutions that encourage the economic, cultural, and intellectual development of our citizens. Here in Montreal, we have such organizations that are helping break social exclusion and fortifying our community bonds. We think specifically of the CDEC (Corporation de developpement économique communautaire). Since 1989, the CDEC has as a mission the development and consolidation of community-based economic activities.

We urge the federal government to:
• increase financial and logistical support for social development projects and/or organizations and;
• work with provincial and municipal governments as well as members of the business community to devise new ways to support entrepreneurial initiatives and basic financial education including but not limited to the an endowment-based funding framework at the community level;

La finance communautaire : une infrastructure de développement économique et d’inclusion sociale à promouvoir
Nous avons la responsabilité, en tant que société libérale et démocratique, de promouvoir et fortifier les organismes et institutions qui permettent à nos citoyens de se nourrir économiquement, culturellement et intellectuellement. Ici même à Montréal, nous avons des organismes qui fonctionnent depuis des années avec comme objectifs le développement économique, l’inclusion sociale et la fortification du tissu communautaire. Nous pensons ici particulièrement à la CDÉC (corporation de développement économique communautaire) qui depuis 1989 a pour mission de développer et consolider l’activité économique des populations locales de Montréal, ainsi que lutter contre l’exclusion sociale.

C’est avec cette conviction que nous encourageons vivement le gouvernement fédéral à :
– Augmenter le soutien financier et logistique pour le développement de projets sociaux et/ou soutenir les organismes qui travaillent à cette fin.
– Travailler avec les gouvernements provinciaux et municipaux, ainsi que la communauté des affaires, afin de mieux appuyer les initiatives entrepreneuriales et l’éducation financière de base, ainsi que la création d’un cadre de dotation financière au niveau communautaire.

Theme 4: The Creative and Competitive Economy / Thème 4 : Une économie créative et compétitive

The Information Superhighway
To those of us born in the information age, it is obvious that improving our government’s efficiency will rely upon, and greatly benefit from, the use of the Internet and web applications. The potential of broadband technologies to revolutionize how the Canadian government bolsters its economy and social well-being is an exciting future that awaits all of us. Ideas are limitless: from greater government transparency through online consultations and town halls, to mobile voting, to greater accountability not only from governments, but also from its citizens.

If there ever was a time where the integrity of democracy could be radically improved, it is now in the 21st century. As the construction of cross Canada railways uplifted the country through igniting industry, bringing all of Canada online can unite the country through a strengthened democracy and self-reflective community.

Yet, this future is only possible if the entire country has access. Due to the sheer size of this nation there are many remote communities in every province and territory still without Internet connections, or at best they have dial-up, and at the web’s current rate of advancement dial-up internet is assuredly not enough.

In short, free market forces have no financial interest in equipping these communities with high speed access, leaving them behind in a society where access to web resources is an assumed given.

To ensure the integrity of our government’s migration online, how should the Canadian government proceed to ensure that every citizen has access to broadband Internet by 2017?

Réseuatage d’internet national
Pour ceux d’entre nous qui sont nés dans l’ère de l’information, il est évident que l’amélioration de l’efficacité de notre gouvernement dépendra de l’utilisation de l’internet. Le potentiel des technologies à large bande de révolutionner les moyens par lesquels le gouvernement canadien soutient son économie et son bien-être social promet un futur excitant pour tous les Canadiens. Les idées sont illimitées : en commençant par plus de transparence gouvernementale, par des consultations télédiffusées sur le web, en explorant la capacité de voter à distance, à plus de responsabilités non seulement des gouvernements, mais aussi des citoyens.

S’il n’y a jamais eu un meilleur moment où notre démocratie pourrait être améliorée de façon radicale, c’est maintenant au 21e siècle. Comme la construction du chemin de fer au 19e siècle, donner accès à l’internet à tous les Canadiens pourrait unir le pays à travers une démocratie plus forte.

Par contre, ce futur est seulement possible si le pays en entier peut y avoir accès. Dû à la grandeur de notre nation, dans chaque province et territoire il existe plusieurs communautés éloignées qui n’ont toujours pas accès à une connexion internet haute vitesse. Tout au plus, ces communautés ont accès à une connexion bas débit et cela n’est certainement pas raisonnable.

La réalité est que les forces du marché libre n’ont aucun intérêt financier à donner les ressources nécessaires à ces communautés afin d’avoir un accès à l’internet, les laissant derrière dans une société et une économie qui dépendent d’un accès à l’internet.

Afin d’assurer l’intégrité de nos gouvernements dans leurs migrations en ligne, comment le gouvernement canadien devrait-il procéder afin d’assurer que chaque citoyen ait accès à Internet haute vitesse/large bande avant 2017 ?

Déterminer la nouvelle direction libérale

Le vendredi 26 mars 2010

Le Parti libéral du Canada tient samedi et dimanche une grande conférence qui réunit à Montréal quelques grands penseurs dans des domaines aussi divers que l’économie, la santé et l’environnement.

Ce colloque, auquel sont conviées quelque 300 personnes triées sur le volet, devrait, en principe, contribuer au renouvellement des idées au PLC.

Ce renouvellement se planifie dans un contexte où le parti, sous la chefferie de Michael Ignatieff, vit des moments assez difficiles et ne semble pas toujours avoir de direction politique très claire.

Pour comprendre leur état d’esprit, Frank Desoer est allé sonder le coeur et l’âme de certains militants libéraux.

“Canada at 150”: Justin Trudeau and Anthony Di Carlo speak at Lester B. Pearson High School on March 26th, 2010

“Pearson” is a special high school for me since it is where many of my close friends, who I consider like brothers, went to and who I feel like I went there too from all the stories I heard about it. The Secondary 5 students of Lester B. Pearson High School were creative and energized about the idea of contributing to a better Canada for all of us. Their proposals were progressive and their questions for Justin were very pointed (a great response by Justin with regards to the Quebec Liberal veil ban announced earlier that day). Thank you Elizabeth Pellicone, John Panetta and to the students who partook in our “Canada at 150” experience.

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Lester B. Pearson High School on March 26th, 2010 (Part 1)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Lester B. Pearson High School on March 26th, 2010 (Part 2)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Lester B. Pearson High School on March 26th, 2010 (Part 3)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Lester B. Pearson High School on March 26th, 2010 (Part 4)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Lester B. Pearson High School on March 26th, 2010 (Part 5)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Lester B. Pearson High School on March 26th, 2010 (Part 6)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Lester B. Pearson High School on March 26th, 2010 (Part 7)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Lester B. Pearson High School on March 26th, 2010 (Part 8)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Lester B. Pearson High School on March 26th, 2010 (Part 9)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Lester B. Pearson High School on March 26th, 2010 (Part 10)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Lester B. Pearson High School on March 26th, 2010 (Part 11)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Lester B. Pearson High School on March 26th, 2010 (Part 12)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Lester B. Pearson High School on March 26th, 2010 (Part 13)

Lester B. Pearson High School Video Proposal

“Canada at 150”: Justin Trudeau and Anthony Di Carlo speak at John Paul I Junior High School on March 22nd, 2010

The junior high school students of John Paul I were a great contribution to our high series. The students not only prepared great polices and questions for Justin, they also participated in the actual satellite conference discussions of Saturday, March 27 2010. Their involvement not only exemplifies the notion of the “future leaders of tomorrow” but sets a precedence on being the “future leaders of today.”

For more details on their contributions to the project, read the June 8, 2010 Montreal Gazette article, “Students look to country’s future” by J.D. Gravenor.

A huge thank you goes out to Rocco Speranza, Alessandra Di Viccaro, André Pelletier and the International Baccalaureate (IB) students.

Students from John Paul I Junior High School with Justin Trudeau
Students from John Paul I Junior High School with Justin Trudeau

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John Paul I High School on March 22nd, 2010 (Part 1)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John Paul I High School on March 22nd, 2010 (Part 2)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John Paul I High School on March 22nd, 2010 (Part 3)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John Paul I High School on March 22nd, 2010 (Part 4)

John Paul I Junior High School – Proposal 1

John Paul I Junior High School – Proposal 2

John Paul 1 Junior High School – Proposal 3

John Paul I Junior High School – Proposal 4

John Paul I Junior High School – Proposal 5

John Paul I Junior High School – Proposal 6

John Paul I Junior High School – Proposal 7

John Paul I Junior High School – Proposal 8

John Paul I Junior High School – Proposal 9

“Canada at 150”: Justin Trudeau and Anthony Di Carlo speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010

John F. Kennedy was a great experience since it is the high school that was located in the Papineau riding. The high school is located 5 minutes from my home and it is where my father and uncle attended high school. It is at John F. Kennedy High School where I learned how to swim and improve my soccer skills. Thank you to Frank Lofeodo and the students for taking the time to hear us.

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 1)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 2)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 3)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 4)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 5)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 6)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 7)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 8)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 9)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 10)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 11)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 12)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 13)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 14)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at John F. Kennedy High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 15)

“Canada at 150”: Justin Trudeau and Anthony Di Carlo speak at Perspectives I High School on March 19th, 2010

I have fond memories of Perspectives I High School. Once a year, while I attended St. Michael’s Elementary School, we used to walk over to Perspectives I High School (when it used to be called John VI High School) for their annual book fair. It was there where I bought my first books and began my personal pursuit of knowledge and truth. Our speeches were independently grounded to the realities of the students who currently attend the school. It was a dialogue from our hearts and perhaps one of Justin and I’s most memorable speeches throughout the “Canada at 150” high school series. For those interested, here is the article that I referenced in my speech about my academic situation during CEGEP: “How to succeed in CEGEP”.

Thank you Father Westphal and the students of Perspectives I High School for allowing us the opportunity to tell our story.

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Perspectives I High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 1)

Justin Trudeau and I speak at Perspectives I High School on March 19th, 2010 (Part 2)